10 Common Questions About the Texas Probate Process

The probate process in Texas can be extremely daunting and confusing if you are unfamiliar with it. With all the legal paperwork and court proceedings, it’s easy to get lost in the shuffle. In this article, we aim to answer some of the most common questions about the Texas probate process to give those who may be unfamiliar a better understanding of what’s involved. From estate executors to heirs, creditors and more, we’ll cover 10 of the most frequent queries about the Texas probate process so you can go into it with confidence.

What is probate?

Probate is the legal process of proving that a Will is valid and that the deceased person’s debts are paid. The executor (personal representative) of the estate files a petition with the court to open probate. Once probate is open, the executor manages the estate according to the terms of the will and Texas law.

The purpose of probate is to:

  • Prove that the will is valid
  • Identify and inventory the deceased person’s assets
  • Pay debts and taxes from the estate
  • Distribute assets to beneficiaries according to the will or Texas law if there is no will
  • Close the estate when all debts and taxes have been paid and all assets have been distributed.

Who needs to go through probate in Texas?

Assuming the decedent died with a Will in place, probate is generally required in Texas if the estate includes:

  1. Real property worth more than $75,000, or
  2. Personal property worth more than $75,000, or
  3. Any combination of real and personal property that totals more than $75,000.

If the decedent died without a Will (known as intestate), then probate may still be required depending on the value of the estate and who is entitled to inherit under Texas law.

How long does the Texas probate process take?

The Texas probate process can take anywhere from a few months to a year or more, depending on the complexity of the estate and the willingness of the parties involved to cooperate. If the estate is small and there are no disagreements among the heirs, the process can be completed relatively quickly. However, if the estate is large or there are disputes among the heirs, the process can take much longer.

What assets are subject to probate in Texas?

In Texas, the probate process is used to determine the rightful heirs of a deceased person’s estate. The court will appoint an executor to oversee the distribution of assets, and all debts and taxes must be paid before any assets can be distributed to the beneficiaries.

The following assets are subject to probate in Texas: 

  • Real property, such as a house or land
  • Personal property, such as cars, jewelry, or furniture
  • Financial accounts, such as savings or investment accounts
  • Business interests or other professional licenses

If the deceased person had any outstanding debts, those must be paid off before any assets can be distributed to the heirs. The executor will need to file a Petition for Probate with the court, and notify all interested parties of the death. Once the court has granted authority to the executor, they will begin gathering all of the deceased person’s assets and distributing them according to the terms of the will.

How much does it cost to go through probate in Texas?

The Texas probate process can be costly, depending on the size and complexity of the estate. The court will appoint an executor to oversee the process, and he or she will be responsible for paying all required fees. These include filing fees, publication costs, and attorney’s fees. The executor may also be responsible for paying any debts of the decedent, such as credit card balances or outstanding medical bills. If the estate is large and complex, these costs can quickly add up.

Who handles the Texas probate process?

If you are named in a Will as an executor, or if you are the spouse of the deceased, you may begin the probate process in Texas. The first step is to file a petition with the probate court in the county where the decedent lived.

You will need to provide the court with a copy of the death certificate, the original Will (if there is one), and a list of the decedent’s assets and debts. You will also need to pay a filing fee.

Once the petition is filed, the court will issue Letters Testamentary, which appoints you as executor of the estate. With these letters, you will be able to open a bank account for the estate and begin paying debts and distributing assets according to the terms of the Will.

If there is no Will, or if you are not named in the Will as executor, someone else will have to be appointed by the court to serve in that role. The person who is appointed by the court is called an administrator.

What happens if there is no will in Texas?

If there is no will in Texas, the estate will be distributed according to the state’s intestacy laws. Under these laws, the estate will first go to the decedent’s surviving spouse, if any. If there is no surviving spouse, the estate will be divided among the decedent’s children. If there are no children, the estate will be divided among the decedent’s parents. If there are no parents, the estate will be divided among the decedent’s siblings. If there are no siblings, the estate will be divided among the decedent’s grandparents. If there are no grandparents, the estate will be divided among the decedent’s great-grandparents. Finally, if there are no great-grandparents, the estate will go to the state of Texas.

Can the Texas probate process be avoided?

In Texas, the probate process can be avoided if the deceased person’s estate is small enough and if all of the deceased person’s debts have been paid. The deceased person’s estate is considered small enough if it is worth less than $75,000. To avoid probate, the deceased person’s spouse or other heir must file an affidavit with the court that states that the estate is worth less than $75,000.

What is Disinheritance?

In Texas, disinheritance is the legal process of excluding someone from inheriting property from an estate. This can be done for a variety of reasons, including if the person is not financially responsible or if there is bad blood between the person and the estate owner.

To disinherit someone in Texas, the estate owner must specifically state in their will that they are excluding the person from inheritance. Without this explicit language, the person will still inherit a portion of the estate according to Texas law.

There are a few exceptions to this rule. For example, if the excluded person is also the executor of the will, they will still inherit their share of the estate. Additionally, if the excluded person is a spouse or child of the deceased, they may still be entitled to a portion of the estate under Texas law.

What Is an Executor?

An executor is the person who is responsible for handling the estate of a deceased person. This includes tasks such as gathering the deceased person’s assets, paying debts and taxes, and distributing the remaining assets to heirs. The executor must be named in the will or appointed by the court if there is no will.

Conclusion

The Texas probate process can be a complicated and lengthy one. Knowing the answers to these common questions can help you navigate the process more easily. Of course, if at any point during your journey through the probate process you find yourself in need of assistance, you should reach out to an experienced attorney for further guidance. They will be able to answer all of your questions about the process and provide personalized legal advice that is tailored to meet your needs.

Do you need an Experienced Probate Attorney to help?

When it comes to the probate process in Texas, there are a lot of questions that people have. One of the most common questions is whether or not someone needs an experienced probate attorney to help them.

The answer to this question depends on a few factors. If the estate is small and uncomplicated, it might not be necessary to hire an attorney. However, if the estate is large or complex, it is probably a good idea to hire an experienced probate attorney.

An experienced probate attorney can help you navigate the complexities of the probate process. They can also provide guidance on how to distribute the assets of the estate and handle any disputes that might arise.

Call us today for a FREE attorney consultation at (512) 273-7444.

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